Garden Bed Layout Garden Bed Layout Garden Bed 1 Garden Bed 2 Garden Bed 3 Garden Bed 4 Garden Bed 5 Garden Bed 6 Garden Bed 7 Garden Bed 8 Garden Bed 9 Garden Bed 10 Garden Herbs Garden Toolbox
  • Mulch
  • Carrots

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Bed 1

Mulch

Mulch retains moisture in the soil, suppresses weeds, mitigates erosion, and adds organic matter back to the soil as it decomposes. Good mulch materials include straw, leaf mold (leaves that have decomposed over two winters), grass clippings, newspaper, cardboard, and burlap. Wood chips don’t decompose quickly enough to be useful for annual crops. Come next spring, their presence complicates the tilling of the soil.

Carrots

We plant pelletized ‘Napoli’ carrots in late July and watch them grow until late November, at which point they mature into candy-like sweetness. If you mulch them heavily and cover them with a cold frame, you can bring your students out to the garden during a January thaw for an even-sweeter snack. Who knew the garden held such treasures in the middle of winter!

  • Mulch
  • Spinach

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Bed 2

Mulch

Mulch retains moisture in the soil, suppresses weeds, mitigates erosion, and adds organic matter back to the soil as it decomposes. Good mulch materials include straw, leaf mold (leaves that have decomposed over two winters), grass clippings, newspaper, cardboard, and burlap. Wood chips don’t decompose quickly enough to be useful for annual crops. Come next spring, their presence complicates the tilling of the soil.

Spinach

Many school cafeterias around the country are able to get fresh local spinach at a decent price. Even so, many Food Service Directors choose not to purchase it because students don’t eat it. Plant it in late September, let it overwinter in the garden, then harvest small leaves in early April for a flavorful salad. Students will come back for more. Recommended: ‘Space’

  • Field Peas & Oats

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Bed 3

Field Peas & Oats

Plant these at the end of September so that they have time to establish themselves before winter. The Field Peas help fix nitrogen back into the soil while the Oat roots hold the soil together to reduce erosion. Unlike other cover crops, Field Peas and Oats winterkill, saving you the back-breaking work of turning them under.

  • Field Peas & Oats

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Bed 4

Field Peas & Oats

Plant these at the end of September so that they have time to establish themselves before winter. The Field Peas help fix nitrogen back into the soil while the Oat roots hold the soil together to reduce erosion. Unlike other cover crops, Field Peas & Oats winterkill, saving you the back-breaking work of turning them under.

  • Mulch
  • Hardneck Garlic

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Bed 5

Mulch

Mulch retains moisture in the soil, suppresses weeds, mitigates erosion, and adds organic matter back to the soil as it decomposes. Good mulch materials include straw, leaf mold (leaves that have decomposed over two winters), grass clippings, newspaper, cardboard, and burlap. Wood chips don’t decompose quickly enough to be useful for annual crops. Come next spring, their presence complicates the tilling of the soil.

Hardneck Garlic

Grow hardneck garlic. Plant in late October and watch it overwinter. The seedhead it sends up in early June will invite a lesson on pruning. And the seedhead (or scape) can then be ground into a flavorful pesto. Recommended: ‘Music’

Bed 6

Mulch

Mulch retains moisture in the soil, suppresses weeds, mitigates erosion, and adds organic matter back to the soil as it decomposes. Good mulch materials include straw, leaf mold (leaves that have decomposed over two winters), grass clippings, newspaper, cardboard, and burlap. Wood chips don’t decompose quickly enough to be useful for annual crops. Come next spring, their presence complicates the tilling of the soil.

  • Field Peas & Oats

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Bed 7

Field Peas & Oats

Plant these at the end of September so that they have time to establish themselves before winter. The Field Peas help fix nitrogen back into the soil while the Oat roots hold the soil together to reduce erosion. Unlike other cover crops, Field Peas & Oats winterkill, saving you the back-breaking work of turning them under.

Bed 8

Mulch

Mulch retains moisture in the soil, suppresses weeds, mitigates erosion, and adds organic matter back to the soil as it decomposes. Good mulch materials include straw, leaf mold (leaves that have decomposed over two winters), grass clippings, newspaper, cardboard, and burlap. Wood chips don’t decompose quickly enough to be useful for annual crops. Come next spring, their presence complicates the tilling of the soil.

  • Field Peas & Oats

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Bed 9

Field Peas & Oats

Plant these at the end of September so that they have time to establish themselves before winter. The Field Peas help fix nitrogen back into the soil while the Oat roots hold the soil together to reduce erosion. Unlike other cover crops, Field Peas & Oats winterkill, saving you the back-breaking work of turning them under.

  • Field Peas & Oats

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Bed 10

Field Peas & Oats

Plant these at the end of September so that they have time to establish themselves before winter. The Field Peas help fix nitrogen back into the soil while the Oat roots hold the soil together to reduce erosion. Unlike other cover crops, Field Peas & Oats winterkill, saving you the back-breaking work of turning them under.

  • Sage
  • Thyme
  • Mint
  • Chives

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Herbs

Sage

The nectar of spring sage flowers is a favorite of both pollinating bees and schoolyard kids. The leaves make a great addition to your roasted butternut squash.

Thyme

Thyme flowers in April and is a favorite of many beneficial insects. Its stems make a great addition to chowders and soups.

Mint

This perennial is great for nibbling in the garden. It also makes a soothing cup of tea for a blustery fall day. Beware that it spreads rapidly and can take over a bed within a few years.

Chives

This stalwart perennial provides a light oniony flavor to a variety of dishes, especially spring frittatas. The flowers are edible if you like to chew on tissue paper.

Toolbox

Tools

24 Garden Gloves
24 Transplanter Trowels
2 Large Watering Cans
8 Small Watering Can (1L)
8 Pruning Shears
1 Harvest Knife
2 Garden Spades
4 Garden Forks
4 Garden Claws
2 Bow Rakes
1 Stirrup Hoe
1 Warren Hoe
2 Wire Brushes
4 Tub Trugs (3.5 gal)
4 Buckets
8 Yardsticks
5 Stakes (rebar)
1 Post Driver (red)
1 Rubber Mallet
1 Log Book & Cover
1 Hose
1 Shower Nozzle & Valve
1 Max/Min Thermometer
1 Rain Gauge

Instructions: Click on the beds above to view individual bed details.