Garden Bed Layout Garden Bed Layout Garden Bed 1 Garden Bed 2 Garden Bed 3 Garden Bed 4 Garden Bed 5 Garden Bed 6 Garden Bed 7 Garden Bed 8 Garden Bed 9 Garden Bed 10 Garden Herbs Garden Toolbox
  • Turnips
  • Sugar Snap Peas

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Bed 1

Turnips

This isn’t your grandmother’s turnip. These little treasures have the texture of water chestnuts. Slice them raw into a salad as you would a radish. Salad turnips stand in the field better than radishes and taste better, too! Recommended: ‘Oasis’ or ‘Hakurei’

Sugar Snap Peas

Sugar Snap Peas are the first seeds to be planted in the garden. Kids love planting the green seeds on St. Patrick’s Day. Choose a variety that matures early. This way, students have several weeks of splendid harvest before school ends. The plants will then finish their production in time for carrots to be planted in their place. Choose a bush variety to eliminate the need for trellising. Recommended: ‘Sugar Ann’

  • Crimson Clover

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Bed 2

Crimson Clover

Crimson clover, an annual variety of clover, germinates well in the cool temperatures of early spring. It suppresses other weeds while fixing nitrogen into the soil for the main season crop. Till it into the soil two weeks before planting or transplanting your new crop so that it releases all of its stored energy back into the soil.

Bed 3

Spinach

Many school cafeterias around the country are able to get fresh local spinach at a decent price. Even so, many Food Service Directors choose not to purchase it because students don’t eat it. Plant it in late September, let it overwinter in the garden, then harvest small leaves in early April for a flavorful salad. Students will come back for more. Recommended: ‘Space’

  • Broccoli (Spring)

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Bed 4

Broccoli (Spring)

Choose a variety for spring that creates a nice central head but doesn’t create many side shoots. You’ll want to pull it out of the ground right after a late May harvest to make room for sweet potatoes and to keep the pesky flea beetle from taking shelter in its leaves and roots.

  • Spinach OR Crimson Clover

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Bed 5

Spinach OR Crimson Clover

Spinach: Many school cafeterias around the country are able to get fresh local spinach at a decent price. Even so, many Food Service Directors choose not to purchase it because students don’t eat it. Plant it in late September, let it overwinter in the garden, then harvest small leaves in early April for a flavorful salad. Students will come back for more. Recommended: ‘Space’

Crimson Clover: Crimson clover, an annual variety of clover, germinates well in the cool temperatures of early spring. It suppresses other weeds while fixing nitrogen into the soil for the main season crop. Till it into the soil two weeks before planting or transplanting your new crop so that it releases all of its stored energy back into the soil.

  • Lettuce
  • Hardneck Garlic

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Bed 6

Lettuce

Use the row seeder to plant this in late March. Come mid-May you’ll be up to your ears in lettuce. Recommended: ‘Buttercrunch’ and ‘Red Sails’

Hardneck Garlic

Grow hardneck garlic. Plant in late October and watch it overwinter. The seedhead it sends up in early June will invite a lesson on pruning. And the seedhead (or scape) can then be ground into a flavorful pesto. Recommended: ‘Music’

  • Crimson Clover

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Bed 7

Crimson Clover

Crimson clover, an annual variety of clover, germinates well in the cool temperatures of early spring. It suppresses other weeds while fixing nitrogen into the soil for the main season crop. Till it into the soil two weeks before planting or transplanting your new crop so that it releases all of its stored energy back into the soil.

  • Crimson Clover

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Bed 8

Crimson Clover

Crimson clover, an annual variety of clover, germinates well in the cool temperatures of early spring. It suppresses other weeds while fixing nitrogen into the soil for the main season crop. Till it into the soil two weeks before planting or transplanting your new crop so that it releases all of its stored energy back into the soil.

  • Crimson Clover

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Bed 9

Crimson Clover

Crimson clover, an annual variety of clover, germinates well in the cool temperatures of early spring. It suppresses other weeds while fixing nitrogen into the soil for the main season crop. Till it into the soil two weeks before planting or transplanting your new crop so that it releases all of its stored energy back into the soil.

  • Sweet Alyssum
  • Leek
  • Fingerling Potato

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Bed 10

Sweet Alyssum

Sweet Alyssum flowers by late April and keeps its honey-scented flowers until after the first frost. It attracts beneficial insects by the hundred, so getting it into the garden early provides both fodder for a great lesson on insect ID, and consistent protection for the rest of the garden.

Leek

Leeks are the “onion” of choice for school gardens. Trying to grow an onion can be frustrating because it usually needs to be harvested just before school starts, robbing kids of the experience. Leeks, though, can stand in the field until Thanksgiving (and beyond). Use it to make a creamy potato leek soup! Recommended: ‘King Richard’

Fingerling Potato

Judging by the exclamations you hear on harvest day, you’d think every last kid had struck oil. Truly, the humble potato is the bedrock of civilizations. It’s the pride of Peru, the intimate of the Irish. Kids see its value immediately, especially if its purple! Fingerling potatoes are smaller than the supermarket standard, but they produce more potatoes per plant. Recommended: ‘Purple Peruvian’

  • Sage
  • Thyme
  • Mint
  • Chives

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Herbs

Sage

The nectar of spring sage flowers is a favorite of both pollinating bees and schoolyard kids. The leaves make a great addition to your roasted butternut squash.

Thyme

Thyme flowers in April and is a favorite of many beneficial insects. Its stems make a great addition to chowders and soups.

Mint

This perennial is great for nibbling in the garden. It also makes a soothing cup of tea for a blustery fall day. Beware that it spreads rapidly and can take over a bed within a few years.

Chives

This stalwart perennial provides a light oniony flavor to a variety of dishes, especially spring frittatas. The flowers are edible if you like to chew on tissue paper.

Toolbox

Tools

24 Garden Gloves
24 Transplanter Trowels
2 Large Watering Cans
8 Small Watering Can (1L)
8 Pruning Shears
1 Harvest Knife
2 Garden Spades
4 Garden Forks
4 Garden Claws
2 Bow Rakes
1 Stirrup Hoe
1 Warren Hoe
2 Wire Brushes
4 Tub Trugs (3.5 gal)
4 Buckets
8 Yardsticks
5 Stakes (rebar)
1 Post Driver (red)
1 Rubber Mallet
1 Log Book & Cover
1 Hose
1 Shower Nozzle & Valve
1 Max/Min Thermometer
1 Rain Gauge

Instructions: Click on the beds above to view individual bed details.